7 Horrible Symptoms of Anxiety Summed Up and Simplified - Carl Vernon
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health & Diet, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress

7 Horrible Symptoms of Anxiety Summed Up and Simplified

Headache. Neck ache. Sore throat. Fever. Fatigue. Sleeping problems. An itchy toe. You name it – any symptom can be related to anxiety.

I was in and out of the doctor’s surgery.

I didn’t have a clue if I were coming or going – and I don’t think the doctor did either.

The constant need for reassurance was the overriding issue.

If you’re stuck in a cycle of anxiety (fear), it’s likely you’ll be visiting the doctor often. It’s also very likely you’ll be hitting the internet to see Dr Google for answers.

You might stay stuck in the cycle because you’re not finding the answers you’re looking for.

Because I know how deep the need for answers and constant reassurance goes, I want to give you some quick answers to typical anxiety-related symptoms and disorders that you won’t hear from the doctor.

Health Anxiety

Getting straight to the point, health anxiety is the fear of death. If you’re familiar with my DP Rule from Anxiety Rebalance, you’ll know that our two primary fears are Death and People. When you start dealing with these fears, health anxiety becomes much less of an issue.

Social Anxiety

At its very basic level, social anxiety is caring too much about what people think. When we feel like crap, we prefer to do it in the comfort of our own homes. Longer-term issues with social anxiety arise because avoidance feels good (at first). As time goes by, social anxiety gets worse when we appreciate a reclusive lifestyle isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be. When we get comfortable with the fact that EVERYONE deals with the same issues, including social anxiety, we stop feeling so isolated. We also improve relationships with others – and in turn, drop the social anxiety.

You Care Too Much Book

Panic attacks

In short, panic attacks are bullies that we create when we’re dealing with high anxiety. We become hypersensitive to all our bodily feelings, and when something is off kilter, even slightly, it can cause us to panic (have a panic attack). When you start managing high anxiety better by implementing all the proper lifestyle and mindset changes, panic attacks move on – like all bullies who don’t get attention.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Summed up, OCD is created because we feel out of control in at least one area of our lives. OCD is a way for us to try and get that control back – even if it means coming up with pointless routines that don’t mean anything. So if you hate your job, for example, and feel like there is nothing you can do about it, you might develop OCD as a way of coping with it. Getting back in control (or at least feel like you’re in control) will stop the need for compulsive behaviour.

Constant Worrying Thoughts (Overthinking)

In a nutshell, constant worrying thoughts are brought about by the ‘what if’ type thoughts we produce when we’re anxious and stressed. ‘What if this. . . What if that. . .’.  One thought leads to the next and, before you know it, a small problem has turned into a monster. Learning to control our thoughts will stop the monster from getting out of control.

Depression (Depressive thoughts & low mood)

Very simplified, depression and low mood is a lack of energy and willpower. Being highly anxious and stressed zaps our energy. Energy gives you the get-up-and-go you need for the things you want (and need) to do in life – even the basic everyday things take energy. You can’t do anything without energy. When you’re ready to start working on upping your energy levels through various methods, like good diet and exercise, it helps combat the negative and depressive thoughts.

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia put briefly, is when you play with the wrong odds. When you’re agoraphobic, the fear of leaving your comfort zone (usually your house) becomes the overwhelming fear and prevents you from living a normal life. The fear is based on bad odds. When you appreciate that the odds are heavily favoured towards leaving your house and going to live your life as you want to, the door gets opened and a new comfort zone is built.

Anxiety Rebalance
How the 80/20 Rule Will Help You Deal With Your Worry and Anxiety
Anxiety, Fear, Happiness, Self-Confidence, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

How the 80/20 Rule Will Help You Deal With Your Worry and Anxiety

The 80/20 Rule, also known as the Pareto Principle, shows us why 80% of our worry (and the anxiety that comes with it) is made up by us.

If you haven’t heard of the 80/20 rule (also known as the Pareto Principle), the basic principle of it is that roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

Effects of what? Causes of what? I hear you say.

Anything.

That’s the whole point of the Pareto Principle. It relates to anything – and it’s surprisingly accurate in relation to anything.

Seeing as I spend most of my time in the world of anxiety, and seeing as you’re probably here because you want to manage your anxiety better, I thought it might help us with managing our anxiety. And it does. Massively.

When I discovered the principle and how accurate it was, it helped me appreciate just how much of my worry, anxiety and stress was real and how much was made up by me.

In other words, it helped me see and appreciate that I was my own worst enemy!

How the 80/20 rule relates to overcoming anxiety

The Pareto Principle is such a powerful and accurate principle, it’s well worth us translating its meaning into overcoming anxiety. And that’s the bit I want to help you with.

When we link the 80/20 rule with overcoming anxiety, it shows us that 8/10 of your problems don’t exist.

That’s a decent bit of knowledge to have – especially when it comes to reducing our anxiety.

You’ll have about 60,000 thoughts tomorrow. If you’re dealing with high anxiety, most of those thoughts will be worrying ones. You know the type of worrying thoughts I’m talking about. They normally start with ‘what if…?’. They’re thoughts based on us trying to predict the future and worrying about the past (what’s already happened).

Summed up: Overthinking.

What the Pareto Principle shows us is out of all those worrying thoughts you have, 8 out of 10 of them won’t be real. 8 out of 10 of the things causing you anxiety is made up by you.

On the flipside of that, it means that roughly 20% of the things you worry about are worth worrying about. They’re the things worth spending your time on. And when you spend your time on those things, they make a difference to your life.

What does this knowledge do for you?

I’m hoping it does two things:

  1. It helps you appreciate that nearly all of your worry, and therefore all of your anxiety, is made up by you. That means that when you start taking more control the impact can be significant.
  2. It instantly reassures you to know that your problems and worries aren’t as big and overwhelming as you thought they were. When you focus on the 2/10 things that count, it gives you the confidence to know you can handle it.

Try it for yourself.

If you’ve read this and think the 80/20 rule is a bit of a crock, or you’re still not convinced, try it for yourself.

When you wake up tomorrow, have a piece of paper and pen handy, and write down every worrying type thought you have throughout the day, no matter how big or small.

At the end of the day, go through your list and tick all the thoughts you had that were made up – all the worrying thoughts that were not real – things that didn’t happen.

I’d be very surprised if at least 80% of those thoughts on your list weren’t ticked.

BTW – If you’ve got all your predictions for the future 100% accurate, please get in touch. You and I can make some serious money.

Anxiety Rebalance
3 Big Myths About Sleep, Insomnia And Anxiety
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health & Diet, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Stress, Success & Wellbeing, Work-life Balance

3 Big Myths About Sleep, Insomnia And Anxiety | Stephanie Romiszewski

Channel 4’s The Secrets of Sleep expert and leading Sleep Physiologist, Stephanie Romiszewski, gave us some big insights into sleep problems and insomnia related to anxiety.

Stephanie is a rebel.

You have to admire anyone who is willing to take a big subject, like sleep, and challenge the status quo.

Sleep, like anxiety, is one of those things where lots of people have lots of different opinions. One ‘expert’ will tell you something different to another ‘expert’.

What I liked about Stephanie’s approach is how open she is to all methods and solutions for sleep problems and insomnia, but rather than just blindly practising those methods (like most other ‘experts’ do), she is keen to add a new approach.

By having a new approach, Stephanie is breaking some of the myths around sleep problems (including anxiety-related insomnia) and giving us some real solutions we can work with.

Here are the top three myths about sleep problems, insomnia and anxiety we uncovered.

Myth #1: Relaxation and sleep are connected

When we think of sleeping, we think of relaxing. The two things naturally go together. But they’re not actually connected. I know, crazy, right!

When I asked Stephanie if she recommended any sleep apps, including sleep trackers, she said no, not really. Why? Because there is no research to suggest that relaxation will help you get to sleep.

We should be aiming to relax in the day, rather than when we go to bed at night.

If you want to use apps and methods to help you deal with stress and anxiety, they’re more useful in the day than at night. And when you think about it, it makes sense. How you start your day sets the tone for the rest of the day. If you start your day feeling relaxed by controlling your anxiety and stress from the get-go, your day will continue in the same fashion, and you’ll go to bed feeling the same way.

That will put you in a much better position to sleep well, rather than try to force relaxation when it’s sleepy time.

Myth #2: The time you go to bed is more important than the time you wake up

The media have done a great job at scaremongering us into thinking we need to go to bed at the same sensible time every night, which is why most of us hit the pillow and don’t feel sleepy.

I don’t know about you, but I hate going to bed and feeling pressurised to sleep when I don’t feel tired. Sometimes, it almost feels like I’m forcing myself to get those eight hours.

Going to bed at the same time every night is not the key to good, consistent sleep. It’s the time you get up in the morning that is more important!

Stephanie suggests that the best time to go to bed is when you’re ‘sleepy tired’ – when you’re literally nodding off in your chair. If you do that and wake up at the same time every day, that will build up enough ‘awake time’ to get a good consistent pattern of sleep.

The key to making this work is getting up at the same time, every day.

Myth #3: Sleep deprivation is the same as insomnia

I can relate to this, big style!

Feeling fatigued (like crap) is a common symptom of anxiety and stress. The overthinking and worry zaps your energy, so you feel like a zombie.

When anxiety was crippling me, all I wanted to do was sleep all day. And I did. Some days I’d sleep for sixteen hours straight. That’s why on the Rebalance Scale in Anxiety Rebalance, sleep is at the bottom of the scale – because it represents low mood (depression) and low energy.

On the flipside of that, I also went through long periods of sleep deprivation. At the time, if you’d have asked me why I looked like a drooling zombie, I’d have said it was down to insomnia. But it wasn’t. I was sleep deprived, and that is a different thing.

Where I went wrong is I didn’t get the pattern right. I was either sleeping too much or too little. I had no routine or benchmark to set a better pattern.

 

 

The conclusion and action to take.

If anxiety is preventing you from going to sleep, try going to bed when you feel ‘sleepy tired’ – when your head is nodding. It doesn’t matter what time it is, go to bed then. The trick to making this work is getting up at the same time every day. Set your alarm and don’t sleep past it, no matter how tired you feel when you wake up. That will build up enough ‘awake time’, and if you stay patient and do this consistently enough, you’ll eventually sort out your sleeping pattern.

You might feel tired and drained in the day, but if you can get through that pain barrier, you’ll want to sleep at night. You’ll get a decent night’s sleep and getting up in the morning won’t be the heavy task it was before.

Anxiety Rebalance
Anxiety, Depression, Happiness, Self-Confidence, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

3 Steps That Will INSTANTLY Improve Your Mood

We usually take the longest and hardest route when trying to change our mood. What is the easiest and fastest route, and how can you change your mood instantly?

We all get anxious, stressed and feel low at times – perfectly normal.

But do you find yourself getting trapped in a mood?

Maybe you wake up feeling instantly anxious?

Maybe a particular setting (like your office) causes a constant feeling of stress?

Maybe you feel so low you don’t want to get out of bed in the morning?

I hear you.

I’ve been through the lot myself.

Sometimes it feels like no matter what you try and do, you just can’t shake off the mood that keeps you feeling stressed, anxious and depressed.

If this sounds familiar to you, I’ve got a suggestion and a three-step process that might be useful to you.

How can we instantly change our mood?

Let’s use anxiety and stress as the two examples here, seeing as it’s these two things that tend to dominate how we feel.

What do we usually do when we get anxious?

I used to do one of two things.

  1. Stay rooted to the same spot (a chair that I would sit in) and let all the worrying and anxious thoughts consume me – to the point of overthinking every last possible detail.
  2. If I weren’t frozen in the same spot, I’d pace up and down from one spot to the next, back and forth.

And what do we usually do when we get stressed?

If I were in the office at work, I’d sit at my desk hiding behind my computer, put my face in my hands and start rubbing my temples – wishing away all the crap that was causing me the stress.

Being frozen to the spot or pacing up and down is a natural reaction to anxiety. Just like putting your face in your hands and rubbing your temples is a natural reaction to stress. But what do you think these natural reactions are doing?

My point here will make total sense in just a second.

But before we move on, I want to highlight one more thing with a quick exercise.

Quick exercise:

Imagine someone who is depressed.

You can’t see this person. They’re behind a door or wall.

What do they look like?

Their head is down to the ground. Their eyes are looking down. Their shoulders are slumped. Pretty much everything is facing downwards, right?

That’s because the natural reaction to depression (feeling low) is to do all these things with our body.

When we feel like crap, the last thing we want to do is jump for joy.

Our mind (how we feel mentally) tells our body to portray how we’re feeling (the physical reaction). It’s a natural process.

Here’s where it all gets interesting . . .


Your body speaks volumes

By doing all these natural bodily reactions, we’re fuelling the negative mood. We’re reinforcing why we should be feeling that way.

When we stay rooted to the same spot we stay anxious.

When we put our heads in our hands we stay stressed.

When we stay in bed we stay depressed.

If we want to instantly improve our mood, we have to look at our physicality – what we’re doing with our body.

In other words, changing our mental state starts with changing our physical state.

It’s a big misconception – the idea that we have to change our thoughts to change how we feel. It’s not entirely accurate.

There’s no doubt that you get a better outcome when you think more positively compared to thinking negatively, but changing your physical state is a much quicker and easier way to change your mood compared to positive thinking.

Trying to override your negative thoughts with positive affirmations is usually a waste of time. 

It’s incredibly difficult. Almost impossible.

Try telling yourself you’re not stressed when you’re in the middle of a shit storm. Ain’t gonna happen!

The best way to manage your state of mind (your mood) is to first concentrate on what you’re doing with your body.

The 3-step process to improve your mood

To simplify the process of improving our mood, let’s look at it as three steps.

1. STATE OF MIND =

2. ACTION =

3. RESULT

Your state of mind (your mood) dictates what you’re going to do next (your action), and that produces the outcome (the result).

When you have a negative state of mind (including negative body language) it creates a negative action, and that will always give out a negative result.

(Put shit in, get shit out.)

By becoming more aware of this simple process and making just a small change in our physical state, we can change the entire process so it looks like this.

CHANGE IN PHYSICAL STATE = DIFFERENT ACTION = BETTER RESULT

The better result in this instance is an instant improvement in mood.

(Put good stuff in, get good stuff out.)

Choose your mood - Carl Vernon

Try it for yourself.

The next time you find yourself getting trapped in an anxious, stressed or depressed mood, remember that it’s your physical state that will make the difference.

Rather than allow your thoughts (your mind) to control what your body does, do something completely different.

For example, when you get stressed or anxious, don’t stay rooted to the same spot. Get up and go do something. Completely change your focus. That ‘something’ could be a hobby. It doesn’t matter. It can be anything – as long as you don’t stay trapped in the body that an anxious/stressed mind wants to keep you in.

When you can break free from this natural pattern dictated by our minds, you can break the pattern of your mood.

Put your chin up, keep your eyes up, put your shoulders back, lift your chest, breathe confidently and deeply, and smile.

You might not feel like doing these things, but that is exactly the point.

It takes time to override what our mind wants us to do naturally, but the more you become aware of this process and the more you practise, the better you’ll get.

Remember that you hold the cards. You hold the power over your mood – everyone does. It’s you who gets to choose your mood.

Choose your mood by changing what you do with your body. The rest will follow.

Anxiety Rebalance
Why does anxiety make me overthink?
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health & Diet, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

Why Does Anxiety Make Me Overthink Everything?

From the basic things like going to the shop, to the more challenging things like going to work, anxiety has a great way of making you overthink everything you do. How can we stop the torture of overthinking?

It’s those what ifs…

What if this…

What if that…

Sound familiar?

You already know that these ‘what if’ type thoughts are a complete waste of your time and energy. You can’t predict the future.

All these types of thoughts do is cause you massive levels of anxiety and worry.

So why do you keep having them?

Why do we torture ourselves with this pointless overthinking?

High anxiety, and the overthinking that comes with it, is an addiction (a bad habit).

Learning how to channel our focus and energy into something that doesn’t send us crazy is the key to overcoming this worry and overthinking addiction.

Breaking the addiction (bad habit) of worry

Smoking, drugs, alcohol – all types of addictions we know are obvious. The more we use them, the more addictive they become.

When these addictions become a fixed part of our lives they have a detrimental effect on our health and they get harder to break with time.

That’s exactly how worrying thoughts work, too.

The more we experience worrying ‘what if’ type thoughts, the more we get accustomed to them, and the more they become a fixed part of our lives.

Have you considered high anxiety to be an addiction?

It might come across as harsh to put anxiety in the same category as a highly addictive drug, but if you think about how anxiety works, it’s just as addictive.

High anxiety is a less obvious addiction than smoking, for example, but the worry that comes with anxiety is as addictive as nicotine. (Just replace an anxious thought with the craving of a cigarette, and you’ll see the similarities.)

Break the bad habit of anxiety

Just like craving a cigarette, when you’re anxious, you crave worry.

You actually go looking for things to worry about – especially when you catch yourself not worrying.

Hang on a minute. Why am I not worrying? What can I start worrying about?!

A clear and calm mind will quickly jump into a panic.

The next stop is usually Dr Google to search those anxiety-related symptoms – another part of the addiction.

The more time you’ve allowed anxiety to dictate your life, the harder it is to kick the habit.

But that’s not to say you can’t kick the habit.

You can.

Like any addiction, overcoming high anxiety takes a shift in focus and energy.

We can prevent those ‘what if’ type thoughts by refocusing and channelling our energy into something constructive – something that works for us – not something destructive that only leads onto further ‘what if’ type thoughts that create more anxiety and worry.

Channelling your focus and energy

As a high anxiety sufferer, you have a gift.

The gift you’ve been given is creativity.

You can’t be consistently anxious without a creative mind!

Your creative mind can be used to create more anxiety (overthinking and worry), or it can be used for something much better – something that will get you excited and build the future you want.

Creative anxious mind

There are lots of ways you can channel your creativity.

  • Painting
  • Learning an instrument
  • Singing
  • Writing
  • Learning a new language
  • Dancing (also good because it’s physical)
  • Knitting (yes, knitting)
  • Gardening

Pretty much anything that takes up your full powers of creativity – which is the aim. You don’t want to leave any wriggle room for anxiety to creep in.

My personal favourite creative hobby (aside from writing) is cooking.

Cooking allows me to use all my creative skills.

And the bonus: I get to eat the creation!

The end result isn’t always edible, but I’ll always have fun putting it together.

These are just a few creative hobby suggestions, and maybe you can think of some of your own?

The aim is to give things a try and stick to what you like.

The more you do the creative things you enjoy, rather than sit still and focus on the ‘what ifs’ that consume you, the more you’ll break the bad habit of worrying and overthinking.

When you’re busy cooking, or painting, or gardening, or learning Spanish, or learning the guitar, you won’t have the time to worry and overthink.

You’ll forget to be anxious.

Anxiety Rebalance
Am I suffering from high anxiety?
Anxiety, Fear, Happiness, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

Am I Suffering From High Anxiety or Normal Anxiety?

We all deal with anxiety. But when do we know we’re dealing with higher than normal anxiety – and when do we need to act?

Let’s not confuse high anxiety with every day NORMAL anxiety – it can make us believe we’re suffering a lot more than we are.

If you need help distinguishing between the two, take a look at the Rebalance Scale.

Rather than list a ton of anxiety-related symptoms you’ll find all over the internet provided by Dr Google (the type of lists that only serve to increase our anxiety even more), let’s pinpoint how to identify high anxiety from normal anxiety using this one simple question.

Am I able to do everyday things, like go to the shop and see friends, without having to think too much about it?

This question helps you recognise if you’re overthinking – a sure sign of high anxiety.

Overthinking

If the answer to the above question is a clear NO, it’s likely your anxiety levels are above normal.

Anxiety is affecting you more than it should be, making it high anxiety.

With normal anxiety, you can do everyday things like see friends and go to the shop without the need to overthink them. They are just part of what you do.

When high anxiety has a grip on us, our mind races off in a thousand different directions.

Small things bother us.

Corner of rug up causing anxiety

We overthink every scenario until going to the shop becomes a life-threatening disaster (before we’ve even stepped out of our front door).

It’s the old ‘what ifs…’

What if this…?

What if that…?

This is overthinking at its best (or worse).

Overthinking can get us to a point when it feels abnormal not to worry.

When you don’t worry, you actually go looking for things to worry about!

It’s like worrying becomes a bad habit.

It’s this habit that leads to living in the world of what if…

The world of what if…

When we’re dealing with higher than normal anxiety, we live in what I call the world of what if…

It’s not a nice place to live.

Everything is over the top and exaggerated.

Things are rarely positive, and there isn’t anything to look forward to.

The worse case scenario is the one we believe to be true.

Like when going to see friends, for example – it’s not the pleasurable experience most people get from it – it’s something we dread doing.

Going out for a drink has suddenly turned into absolute panic.

Holding head in hands

Overthinking causes negative thoughts.

By the time Saturday comes around, you’ve worried so much you end up cancelling.

Overthinking (living in the world of what if…) has created endless stories about all the horrible things that might happen, so you come to the conclusion it’s best not to bother.

These are the stories high anxiety fools us into believing.

We have about 60,000 thoughts a day.

Think about how many of these thoughts actually come true.

The worse case scenario is usually far from reality.

In other words, high anxiety needs a reality check!

And when you check reality by using rational thinking, you’ll start lowering your anxiety levels.


When do I need to act on my anxiety?

If you find yourself overthinking everyday activities, or you’re worrying excessively, or you’re living in the world of what if… for longer than your common sense tells you should, it’s time to act.

If it’s allowed to continue, high anxiety will keep you trapped in a pattern of behaviour that is no good for you. You’ll overthink so much, your brain will think it’s normal to act that way.

Like a bad habit, you’ll continue practising living a life dominated by high anxiety – until you break the pattern.

It’s time to take action, break the pattern, and do something different.

Like the main man, Albert Einstein says:

You have to do something different if you want a different result.

To set yourself on a new journey – one that isn’t plagued by overthinking, worry and high anxiety, you have to start acting in the way you want your life to be.

To achieve it, all it takes is one small step.

That step will lead to bigger and better things.

Anxiety Rebalance
Anxiety Rebalance stones
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health & Diet, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

The Truth About Anxiety

Discovering the truth about anxiety helped me completely change the way I deal with it. So, what is the truth about anxiety, and how can it help you?

It was an eye-opening experience when I first looked into anxiety – to say the least!

For many years I thought I was the only person on the planet going through it.

That changed rapidly when I googled ‘Anxiety’ for the first time and read about other people’s anxiety-related symptoms and experiences.

This was some time ago now. Today, life is different.

Back then, anxiety consumed me. I battled with it from the moment I woke up to when I struggled to get to sleep at night.

Every day was a living nightmare.

It’s hard to describe just how bad it was, but if you’re reading this, I’m sure you have a good idea.

Answers were the one big thing I craved when I was suffering from crippling anxiety.

No matter how hard I searched, I couldn’t find them.

Don’t get me wrong – there was always plenty of information and advice available. But most of it was rubbish or a scam to get my money.

After decades of being frustrated and disillusioned, I decided to find the answers myself.

On this journey, there was no greater discovery than what I’m about to share with you.

It saved me years of suffering and pain. It was literally a lifesaver.

I hope it does the same for you.

Truth #1: There is NO cure for anxiety (and there never will be)

No wonder I looked for a ‘cure’ for my anxiety for as long as I did.

It’s because it doesn’t exist!

Stop wasting your precious time and effort.

Stop pulling your hair out and hitting bricks walls.

No cure for anxiety

There is no cure for anxiety.

But don’t worry – anxiety not having a cure isn’t a bad thing.

This key piece of knowledge isn’t designed to reinforce the belief that nothing can be done about high anxiety. In fact, it’s the complete opposite.

It’s great news. 

It just means we have to look at anxiety differently.

It means you can stop chasing a cure you’ll never find and, instead, focus on managing your anxiety better.

Or, as I put it, get more BALANCE in your life.

> Anxiety Rebalance: Where Do You Come on The Rebalance Scale?

So, that’s truth number one to help you on your new journey – there is no cure for anxiety and your search stops here.


Truth #2: It’s IMPOSSIBLE to eliminate anxiety

If you’re looking for a solution or method that will get rid of your anxiety, stop the heartache and frustration right now.

Like a cure, it won’t happen.

It’s impossible to get rid of anxiety.

Anxiety forms part of who we are. It’s here to stay.

At times, it will feel like your enemy – but it’s not. When we learn to work with anxiety, we transform the way we feel about it.

Plus, anxiety isn’t something you want to get rid of.

Look at it like this…

When you get angry or upset, do you want to get rid of the emotions of anger and sadness completely?

Of course not.

We accept these emotions as part of our lives.

They might come with unwanted feelings and mental pain, but that’s part of the balance of living.

If we accept that getting angry and upset is part of life, isn’t it time we started accepting that it’s also normal to get anxious?

It’s easy to forget that anxiety is normal.

When we’re dealing with high anxiety, we’re dealing with higher than normal anxiety – that’s it.

Anxiety only becomes abnormal and something we need to tackle when it stays with us – when it feels like we can’t shake it off.

That’s when we know we have to manage it better – not get rid of it.


Overcoming anxiety is a life’s journey

I’ve mentioned ‘the journey’ a few times.

Overcoming anxiety is a life’s journey – one that doesn’t end.

Life has a habit of throwing all kinds of stuff at us – good and bad.

The trick is making this journey a more pleasurable one.

There are lots of ways we can do it. Things like living in the moment a bit more, and being able to stop our overthinking and worry – these things will do the trick.

Anxiety might feel like it’s winning right now, but if you’re willing to make some small steps, it won’t stay like that.

Let’s not allow anxiety to keep us trapped and stuck in the mud – let’s keep moving forward.

Here’s a couple of suggestions…

Read my bestselling book, Anxiety Rebalance – it has all the answers you need.

Join the Rebalance Club.

Or continue having a read of the blog.

Whatever you choose, I wish you all the best on your new journey.

Carl

Anxiety Rebalance