Panic Attacks - Stop the bully
Anxiety, Fear, Panic Attacks, Toxic People

Panic Attacks: Stop The Bully

We’ve all faced a bully at some point.

School, work, college, home – they’re everywhere.

They exist because they can.

There are two sides to bullying. (1) the bully, and (2) the victim.

For a bully to do what they do, there needs to be a victim.

You might not have chosen to get bullied, but being a victim is a choice.

When it comes to being bullied by panic attacks, we can choose not to be a victim any longer.

The surprising connection between a bully and a panic attack

Panic attacks and bullies operate in the same way.

Panic attacks can only exist in a highly anxious, vulnerable state of mind. That is where they flourish. With all the ‘what if’s. . .’, there’s plenty of fuel to stoke the fire of panic.

When our minds are controlled and confident, there’s no victim – nothing for the panic attack to feed on.

What is a bully’s sole intention?

To inflict mental, emotional, and sometimes physical pain.

How does a bully achieve it?

Through intimidation, and by having the attention he craves. No attention means no fuel to stoke the fire.

Why does a bully, bully?

Who cares. Just know that a bully bullies because he can. Forget about understanding his twisted mentality and why he would want to inflict mental, emotional, and sometimes physical pain. Instead, focus on what matters. Focus on the choice you have.

The choice

When it comes to being bullied by panic attacks, you do have a choice. I want to make that choice clear to you.

Deal with the bully (panic attacks), or face them for the rest of your life.

Why do some people get bullied and others don’t? You might try and factor in physical presence, but you can guarantee there are examples of people with a bodybuilding physique who get bullied – just like there are examples of smaller people who don’t get bullied.

There will be lots of factors that dictate why some people get bullied and others don’t, but the overriding factor is being a victim.

When I say a bully bullies because he can, it’s because there has to be a victim for the bullying to take place.

Being a victim is a choice.

It’s not your fault if someone chooses to bully you, but it is your fault for letting it continue to happen.

Nobody said facing a bully is easy. But is it any harder than the prospect of dealing with panic attacks for the rest of your life?

Handing over your pocket money to the bully might prevent him from hitting you, but he’ll be back for more. The problem doesn’t go away.

Giving your pocket money away only compounds the problem and makes it worse. The more you do it and give in, the more the bully will expect you to do it.

You have to get to a place that says no more.

I don’t care how you get there, but you have to reach a level where you’re so pissed off with being pushed around, you’re not willing to take it any longer.

I found the best emotion to tap into for this is anger.


If you’re getting bullied by panic attacks, you should be angry.

Anger, when channelled in the right way, is an emotion that supersedes panic. It’s the quickest tool you can use to break the victim mentality.

Get frustrated. Get angry. Get however you need to get to create change.

Unlike your dad’s advice, I’m not telling you to punch the bully in the face. That’s the good thing about a panic attack. You don’t need to.

Anyway, punching yourself in the face won’t do you any good.

You are your own bully

When I say ‘you are your own bully’, I’m not suggesting you get a perverse pleasure in causing yourself mental pain. Of course you don’t. Nobody enjoys panicking and suffering a panic attack.

Your bully is born from habit.

Through patterns of habit and behaviour, your brain has associated things it shouldn’t with a threat to your survival. It’s this association that causes the panic (panic attacks). And it’s this way of thinking that makes you your own bully.

Everyday things like going to the supermarket and seeing friends become unachievable because of the state of mind you’ve created.

This state of mind gets unravelled and dealt with when you start seeing panic attacks for what they really are: bullies.

Confront the bully

The next time you feel the bully (panic attack) provoking you, I want you to say: ‘DO YOUR WORST!’. If you can, shout it. Get angry. You don’t have to verbally say it. Say it in your head. However you say it, mean it.

If there is one thing a bully doesn’t like, it’s confrontation.

That’s why, when you say ‘DO YOUR WORST!’, it won’t get worse – it will get better.

This is a trigger to remind yourself that you’re no longer willing to put up with panic attacks and the physical symptoms they cause any longer.

Like all bullies, pride might dictate that there is some initial retaliation. Pass through it. Keep getting angry, and keep confronting it.

It will soon get the message.

While you do this, please be comforted in the knowledge that a panic attack has NEVER caused anyone any physical harm, ever. Doesn’t this just go to prove that the fear we create is much worse than anything else we experience?

When we don’t fuel the fear (anxiety), there is nothing for the panic attack (bully) to work with.

I’ll repeat the choice that you have.

Deal with the bully (panic attacks), or face them for the rest of your life.

I used to have 4-5 severe panic attacks every day.

Since I’ve adopted this mentality, I’ve not had one since.

Does the bully try it on every now and again?

You bet it does.

While I’m facing new challenges and growing, I wouldn’t expect it any other way.

But now, when I ‘feel’ the sensations of a panic attack, I simply adopt the same physical and mental stance I always adopt.

‘PANIC. GO FUCK YOURSELF.’

Anxiety Rebalance
Health Anxiety - Let Go of the Obsessive Thoughts
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health & Diet, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Stress

Health Anxiety: My Experience, and What My Trip to A&E Taught Me

It feels like a constant and endless battle.

Those obsessive thoughts running through your mind about your health or the health of the people closest to you just don’t let up.

What else could I be talking about but health anxiety?

My experience with health anxiety

After a while, I became relatively immune to the obsessive thoughts about my health. I was having so many negative thoughts about my health throughout the day, I began to think they were normal.

With this said, the thing that got me, each and every time, were the exaggerated obsessive thoughts. You know the ones I mean.

‘Is this headache the brain tumour I’ve always thought it was?’

‘Is this bit of chest pain the heart attack I’ve been expecting?’

I could have three headaches a day over the process of a month, and no matter how irrational it was, I’d still be convinced the next headache was ‘the one’.

It was the fear about the exaggerated thoughts that created the obsession.

The fear became my absolute focus and it consumed me, day and night.

It led to the endless trips to the hospital for ECGs, tests and scans – all coming back with negative results.

I’m reluctant to say ‘positive results’ because, at the time, I just wanted a diagnosis so I could move on.

Surely all these symptoms can’t be related to anxiety?

They were, but that didn’t stop the trip to A&E.

The trip to A&E

In my early 20’s, I left work early because I was convinced I was going to die. I ended up driving straight to A&E in total panic.

I approached the lady at the desk, quietly informing her that I was experiencing chest pains, and it felt like there was a tight band around my heart. (I still wasn’t sure whether or not there was something seriously wrong, so I was hesitant and slightly embarrassed. At this point, I also had no idea I was suffering from anxiety. I didn’t know what anxiety was at the time.)

I was sat down and told to take some pills while I waited. I think they were painkillers. I didn’t ask what they were, I just took them and waited.

I sat in the waiting area with the people around me bleeding and coughing. Their very real ailments kept me wondering whether or not my symptoms were real. There was no doubt the chest pains I was experiencing were real – but were they bad enough for me to be here? It just added to the confusion.

After about an hour and a half (which seemed more like three days) I was called through to speak to a nurse. I explained my symptoms, including the chest pain, and she took me through to lie on a bed, where I was strapped up to a blood pressure monitor.

As the nurse put the pads over my chest, I looked over at the monitor with the bouncy line and numbers. Did they mean I was dying? The unknown was enough to increase my heart rate tenfold.

As I laid on the bed, about half an hour passed, and I began to calm down as I appreciated I was in a pretty good place if anything serious was wrong. With the new state of mind, the chest pain and tightness began to subside.

The nurse came over to look at the monitor results. She didn’t say anything, which was a little concerning. Does that mean it’s bad news? She didn’t seem too concerned, which added to the conflicting feelings. I was reluctant to say anything – I didn’t want to know if it were bad news.

She came back five minutes later and reassured me that everything was OK. The test results were fine.

Although grateful for the news, I didn’t jump off the bed in delight. I was still confused by the whole experience.

She mentioned something about stress and something called a ‘panic attack’, but it was brief with no real substance. The focus was on the test results, and those being OK. I was confirmed as a free man – free to leave whenever I wanted.

I got up and started walking out of the hospital back to my car.

It was true. I was a free man – free from the hospital, that is. But the same couldn’t be said for how I felt inside. I didn’t feel free. For a long time after that experience, I remained a prisoner to the fear that something similar could happen again.

But, as with everything in life, if you choose to, you can just about get a positive out of anything. The positives I draw on this experience is the ability to share it, along with some of the answers that have helped me.

Here are three of the standout things I learnt from the A&E experience – and the many other health anxiety-related experiences like it.

Your mind is very powerful

Never underestimate the power of your mind. It can concoct all sorts of anxiety-related symptoms. You name it, your mind can come up with it.

It’s incredibly difficult, but it’s worthwhile spending some time considering whether or not the symptoms you experience are anxiety-related.

Get in the habit of questioning your symptoms, and not just accepting them.

When you experience numbness, is that anxiety?

When you feel sick, is that anxiety?

When you feel dizzy, is that anxiety?

When you’re at their mercy, anxiety-related symptoms will dominate you. You can only start breaking that pattern when you’re willing to question them.

When you’re prepared to say: ‘Wait a minute. Is this symptom real, or is it anxiety tricking me again?’, you naturally and instinctively up your level of self-awareness.

The panic that health anxiety-related symptoms create isn’t as powerful and doesn’t last as long when your self-awareness is higher.

Health anxiety will have a pretty hard time dominating you when you’re self-aware. It won’t be able to trick you as often. It will still have a good go, and even with a surge of rational thinking, it will succeed at times.

But those times will be limited, as long as you keep questioning.

The doctor’s surgery is an addiction

(I’m also going to include Dr Google in this example. When we’re not in the doctor’s surgery, we’re usually asking Dr Google.)

I’ve made jokes about how much I visited the doctor in Anxiety Rebalance.

It’s the constant need of reassurance that does it. The ‘is it, isn’t it’ back-and-forth internal conversation we have about whether or not it is anxiety has us visiting the doctor (a lot).

Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

And it’s hindsight that tells me, unless you have a genuine need to do so, visiting the doctor only fuels the anxiety further. Ultimately, you get nowhere. If your symptoms are anxiety-related, the diagnosis is always the same, no matter how many times you go. The visits only add to frustration and despair.

This is where rational thinking comes into play.

Rather than jump straight on the phone to make the doctor’s appointment, give yourself some space, sit down, and question whether or not it’s anxiety tricking you. If it is, it’s time to realign your focus.

(If you have any doubt, you should always speak to your doctor. Sometimes we need the reassurance to move on. Just remember that, if you’re seeking reassurance often, it is counterproductive.)

Focus is key

You have a couple of choices when anxiety-related symptoms are hitting you.

  1. Allow the symptoms to keep the fear cycle turning. Sit still and let all the anxiety-related ‘what if’ type thoughts attack you. Focus on the fear of death, and allow it to consume you – including all the things you can’t control.
  2. Realign your focus, and focus on what it is you can control.

If you feel like there is nothing in your life you can control, then I suggest you start there. There is always something existing or something you can create that can give you a higher level of control. Focus on that, and everything else, including your health anxiety, won’t play as big of a role in your life.

When I did #1, I stayed trapped. I focused on checking my body for imperfections and continued to worry about the headaches. I was obsessed with the ‘unknown’ and everything I didn’t have control of. The fear created was unbearable.

When I did #2 (which was more difficult), I regained a little more control each time. I focused on the things I could do something about, and that created a new mindset.

Health anxiety isn’t just about worrying about your health. It’s feeling out of control. The only way to balance that is to get some more control.

This creates the only question that matters:

What do you have, or what can you create, that will help you gain more control?

Can you get more control over your job? In a relationship? Doing a hobby?

Realign your focus, and with time and more control, you’ll deal with your health anxiety in an entirely different way.

Anxiety Rebalance
Will I ever overcome anxiety
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

Will I Ever Overcome Anxiety?

Anxiety has a great way of making us feel stuck. It manipulates us into believing all sorts – mostly the negative stuff that keeps us trapped. How do we get out of this trap so we can stop asking questions like will I ever overcome anxiety?

Belief is a powerful thing. Very powerful.

Your life is shaped by what you believe.

How you feel tomorrow will be dictated by what it is you believe right now.

Your belief system is based on what has happened to you in the past. For example, if you’ve experienced panic attacks in a supermarket, it’s likely you won’t like supermarkets and you’ll avoid them.

You’re following habits that you’ve developed over years, sometimes decades.

Some of these habits will be serving you well. Some not so well – particularly the ones that keep you stuck and trapped – like the beliefs built around anxiety.

But that’s not to say you can’t change your habits, and therefore change how you think about anxiety – including the belief that you’ll never overcome anxiety.


The power of belief

What is a belief, and why is it so important when it comes to anxiety?

A belief is something you’re certain about.

When you think about it (whatever ‘it’ is), you come to a quick conclusion about what it means to you.

You can believe anything you like.

‘I’m the most beautiful person on the planet’, for example.

You’ve probably got a friend who believes this to be true? Maybe it’s far from reality. But to the person who believes it to be true, other people’s opinions rarely matter.

That is the power of belief.

And the good news is you have this power. You can believe what you want.

That includes your belief about anxiety, and whether or not you’ll overcome it.

4 minute mile belief

Beliefs are funny old things. They tend to catch on.

Most people won’t believe in something until it’s reality.

Like the four-minute mile that Roger Bannister broke in 1954. Before then, it was considered impossible to do. Nobody had done it, and nobody thought it was worthwhile attempting it.

That was until Roger broke it. As soon as he did, lots of others started breaking the four-minute barrier.

Other people started to achieve it because they thought if he can do it, I can too.

And that’s how I want you to think about overcoming anxiety.

There are lots of people who have been in your position (me included) and changed for the better. They’ve overcome all sorts – high anxiety, panic attacks, OCD, agoraphobia, social anxiety, health anxiety, depression – you name it.

This knowledge should give you the belief that you can do the same.


Change the way you think

You can’t change an outcome without first changing the way you think about it.

If you don’t believe you can win the race, you won’t.

Believe you can win the race and you will

If you don’t believe you can overcome anxiety, you can’t.

Fundamentally, whatever it is you’re telling yourself and whatever it is you’re choosing to believe, is true.

That is the power you hold.

Nobody else holds this power – only you.

Let’s simplify this with two possible beliefs.

Belief #1: I will never overcome anxiety.

Belief #2: Anxiety is normal. It will always be part of my life, and that’s not a bad thing. I’ll continue to face the challenges it brings knowing that I can handle anything that comes my way. There is nothing that I can’t deal with.

Two very different belief systems, each as powerful as the other.

Which one will you choose to believe? Because whichever one you choose to believe is true.

Maybe you’ll choose to believe one of your own?

Whatever it is you choose to believe, remember it’s that belief that is defining your future. It’s dictating how you feel now, tomorrow, and next year.

With this in mind, it pays to be selective about what it is you choose to believe.


Anxiety is normal

One of the most powerful beliefs you can possess is that anxiety is normal.

Knowing anxiety is normal is the first step you can take to changing the way you think about it.

Remember that you don’t need a cure for anxiety, and you don’t need to get rid of it.

Anxiety is normal.

When you’re dealing with anxiety, it’s higher than normal levels of anxiety – that’s it.

When you’ve stopped the pointless battle against anxiety, the second step in dealing with negative thoughts connected with anxiety is identifying which ones are no good for.

The typical negative thoughts associated with anxiety look a little like this:

‘I’m going to have a panic attack when I go to the supermarket.’

‘There is no way I can go to that party.’

‘I’m going to feel anxious tomorrow.’

Remember – these thoughts aren’t real.

They’re only real when you want them to be real – when you choose to believe them.

When you become more conscious about these types of negative thoughts that are fuelled by anxiety, you can do something about them. You can stop them before they get out of control and start influencing your belief system.

If you keep going to the supermarket and experiencing panic attacks, for example, you’re approaching the situation with the wrong belief system. You’re being led by thoughts like ‘I’m going to have a panic attack if I go to the supermarket.’ That’s the type of thought keeping you trapped.

You’ve told yourself you’re going to lose before you’ve started.

The steps you take before going to the supermarket are more important than the ones you take when you’re there.

The outcome is done before you’ve left your house.

In other words, if you approach a situation with negative anxiety-related thoughts dictating your actions, it will lead to the outcome you don’t want. In the instance of going to the supermarket, a panic attack.

If you want to overcome panic attacks, high anxiety, or any negative beliefs about your life, you have to consciously change the way you think – change your belief system.

Go back to the two beliefs, and pick a statement similar to #2.

Reinforce that belief in your mind.

It may not be the truth right now, but that’s not the point.

What we believe now will manifest as reality in the future – even if it’s not true right now.

Remember to be choosy about what thoughts you believe. They are dictating your life.

Anxiety Rebalance
Law of Attraction for Anxiety
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

Does the Law of Attraction Help With Anxiety?

Some of us swear by it. Some of us think it’s rubbish. Most of us have heard of the law of attraction and have a good idea of how it works. Does the law of attraction help with anxiety, and can it work for you?

If you haven’t heard of the law of attraction, the basic principle of it is: You can attract the things you want in life if you think and believe in them.

These things can be money, a partner, a Ferrari, better health – anything you like.

So, if you want better health, for example, all you have to do is think about better health and you’ll attract it in your life.

If you want more money, think about money coming to you.

If you want a partner, think about that partner coming into your life.

… and so on.

Sounds good, right?

It is, but there is a crucial caveat to actually getting these things that the law of attraction misses. It’s the reason most of us wish for things only to be disappointed when they don’t come to fruition.

How many times have you achieved something just by thinking about it?

It’s true. You have to think about and believe in something for it to become real and part of your life. This is the bit where the law of attraction is spot on.

But the law of attraction falls short on the taking action bit.

Let’s take a look at a simple equation based on getting better health the law of attraction way.

Think about better health = Manifest better health in your life

The crucial bit that the law of attraction misses out is in the middle.

Think about better health = TAKE ACTION = Manifest better health in your life

Taking action is what will get you better health. In the example of better health, the action part is exercising.

I know it’s not necessarily what we want to hear, but we have to go do something for something to happen.

The same goes for overcoming anxiety.

Action is the difference between being stuck in the mental mire of anxiety and getting yourself back on track.


The common sense approach to overcoming anxiety

We have tons of thoughts a day (about 60,000). They’re not all real.

The only thing that makes your thoughts real is when you take action on them.

Hoping and praying law of attraction

You decide which thoughts to act on.

You can act on the thought that tells you that you’ll never overcome anxiety, or you can act on the thought that tells you to go do something constructive, like a hobby.

It’s your choice.

The basic principle of the law of attraction is spot on.

What you think of you get more of.

This is the common sense approach that works.

And it is common sense. There is no secret to the law of attraction.

You get more of what it is you think of.

If you think and believe positive things, like overcoming anxiety, you’ll attract positive things in your life.

If you think and believe negative things, like being stuck with high anxiety for the rest of your life, that is more likely to come true.

Henry Ford says it best.

Henry ford anxiety

It’s a lovely concept to think we can get what we want, including overcoming anxiety, just by thinking, wishing, praying, hoping and believing. It’s why the law of attraction is so popular.

But common sense will tell us if we sit in a chair all day thinking, wishing, praying, hoping and believing without adding action, we’re not going to get very far.

If you want to overcome anxiety, you have to take action.

What action will you take to overcome anxiety?

Anxiety will make you feel stuck. It will make you feel like you’re powerless to its manipulative ways.

There is only one way to get out of this mental mire.

Take action.

Action is the cure-all.

Action brings you the wealth you want.

Action bags you the partner.

Action buys the car, house, or whatever it is you want.

Most important of all, action overcomes anxiety.

This leaves one question to answer.

What action are you going to take to overcome anxiety?

Here are a few suggestions.

Don’t just think about it – go do it.

Don’t wish and hope – go make it happen.

Don’t leave any situation without taking an action.

Get in the habit of taking action.

Taking the first step of action might be the anxiety-buster you’ve been waiting for. It could be the one thing that makes all the difference.

Significant change always starts with just one small step. One small action.

Anxiety Rebalance
Why does anxiety make me overthink?
Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Happiness, Health & Diet, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress, Success & Wellbeing

Why Does Anxiety Make Me Overthink Everything?

From the basic things like going to the shop, to the more challenging things like going to work, anxiety has a great way of making you overthink everything you do. How can we stop the torture of overthinking?

It’s those what ifs…

What if this…

What if that…

Sound familiar?

You already know that these ‘what if’ type thoughts are a complete waste of your time and energy. You can’t predict the future.

All these types of thoughts do is cause you massive levels of anxiety and worry.

So why do you keep having them?

Why do we torture ourselves with this pointless overthinking?

High anxiety, and the overthinking that comes with it, is an addiction (a bad habit).

Learning how to channel our focus and energy into something that doesn’t send us crazy is the key to overcoming this worry and overthinking addiction.

Breaking the addiction (bad habit) of worry

Smoking, drugs, alcohol – all types of addictions we know are obvious. The more we use them, the more addictive they become.

When these addictions become a fixed part of our lives they have a detrimental effect on our health and they get harder to break with time.

That’s exactly how worrying thoughts work, too.

The more we experience worrying ‘what if’ type thoughts, the more we get accustomed to them, and the more they become a fixed part of our lives.

Have you considered high anxiety to be an addiction?

It might come across as harsh to put anxiety in the same category as a highly addictive drug, but if you think about how anxiety works, it’s just as addictive.

High anxiety is a less obvious addiction than smoking, for example, but the worry that comes with anxiety is as addictive as nicotine. (Just replace an anxious thought with the craving of a cigarette, and you’ll see the similarities.)

Break the bad habit of anxiety

Just like craving a cigarette, when you’re anxious, you crave worry.

You actually go looking for things to worry about – especially when you catch yourself not worrying.

Hang on a minute. Why am I not worrying? What can I start worrying about?!

A clear and calm mind will quickly jump into a panic.

The next stop is usually Dr Google to search those anxiety-related symptoms – another part of the addiction.

The more time you’ve allowed anxiety to dictate your life, the harder it is to kick the habit.

But that’s not to say you can’t kick the habit.

You can.

Like any addiction, overcoming high anxiety takes a shift in focus and energy.

We can prevent those ‘what if’ type thoughts by refocusing and channelling our energy into something constructive – something that works for us – not something destructive that only leads onto further ‘what if’ type thoughts that create more anxiety and worry.

Channelling your focus and energy

As a high anxiety sufferer, you have a gift.

The gift you’ve been given is creativity.

You can’t be consistently anxious without a creative mind!

Your creative mind can be used to create more anxiety (overthinking and worry), or it can be used for something much better – something that will get you excited and build the future you want.

Creative anxious mind

There are lots of ways you can channel your creativity.

  • Painting
  • Learning an instrument
  • Singing
  • Writing
  • Learning a new language
  • Dancing (also good because it’s physical)
  • Knitting (yes, knitting)
  • Gardening

Pretty much anything that takes up your full powers of creativity – which is the aim. You don’t want to leave any wriggle room for anxiety to creep in.

My personal favourite creative hobby (aside from writing) is cooking.

Cooking allows me to use all my creative skills.

And the bonus: I get to eat the creation!

The end result isn’t always edible, but I’ll always have fun putting it together.

These are just a few creative hobby suggestions, and maybe you can think of some of your own?

The aim is to give things a try and stick to what you like.

The more you do the creative things you enjoy, rather than sit still and focus on the ‘what ifs’ that consume you, the more you’ll break the bad habit of worrying and overthinking.

When you’re busy cooking, or painting, or gardening, or learning Spanish, or learning the guitar, you won’t have the time to worry and overthink.

You’ll forget to be anxious.

Anxiety Rebalance
Why do I have OCD?
Anxiety, Fear, Happiness, Health Anxiety, Panic Attacks, Social Anxiety, Stress

Why do I have OCD?

Routines and rituals are commonplace with OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). But why does OCD have this power over us, and what can we do about it?

What is it for you?

Cleaning rituals? Scanning your body for abnormalities (health anxiety)? Checking doors and locks? Counting routines?

Just a few of the common routines and rituals OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) will have us do.

To the balanced mind, these things might seem crazy.

But to someone who suffers from OCD (like I used to), these routines and rituals are very real.

So, the question is:

Why does OCD have this power over us?

It comes down to one thing: control.

OCD and control

An OCD-related routine or ritual is a way for us to try and take back control.

When we have OCD, we feel out of control in an area of our life, and OCD gives us a way to try and take back control.

OCD Washing hands

OCD is a dysfunctional way of trying to deal with our anxiety, stress and problems. It’s not pleasant, and it’s not something we want to be stuck with for the rest of our lives.

This is the exact reason why we need to manage our intrusive thoughts in a different, more functional and constructive way.

Knowing that we use OCD to try to take back control doesn’t make OCD acceptable.

I mention it here because it’s a nice thing to know.

Like all anxiety-related conditions, there is a complexity that surrounds them, giving us the belief that overcoming them is impossible.

It’s not.

The same goes for OCD.

When we’re armed with answers, we can overcome anything – OCD included.

You now know what it takes to overcome OCD: A new way of taking control of the areas of our lives that make us feel out of control.

The first step to making this happen is to drop the false belief of negative consequences.


Negative consequences OCD has us believing

The real power behind OCD is consequence.

If we don’t do a routine or ritual, OCD will have us believe a negative consequence is in store for us.

That consequence could be any number of things.

Those intrusive thoughts will have you believing all sorts – and it’s usually the worse case scenario.

When we put our rational thinking cap on, THIS IS COMPLETE RUBBISH.

How would not cleaning our hands five times in a row mean we’re going to die?

I’m not watering down the power of OCD here. I know first-hand how insidious OCD is.

If you’ve suffered from OCD for some time, it’s a very hard habit to break.

But it can be broken.

The way to start breaking the habit is identifying the areas of your life you feel are out of your control.


Getting the control back

The most common areas of our lives that cause us stress and anxiety can be split into three.

They all intertwine with each other, but these are the three categories most likely to be affecting your anxiety and stress levels – and therefore your OCD.

> Money

> Relationships (family & friends)

> Work

Most of us aren’t great at dealing with our stress and anxiety, so we tend to try and sweep it under the carpet.

Sweeping issues under the carpet

That’s when issues arise.

When we don’t face our anxiety (fear), it continues to grow. This growth usually comes with more anxiety-related issues, like OCD.

It starts with a bit of stress, and that quickly grows into something bigger, until we find ourselves dealing with intrusive thoughts that make us do these OCD-related routines and rituals.

What area of your life do you feel is out of control?

When you can bring your anxiety (fear) to the surface, you can start dealing with it.

Allowing your anxiety to get bottled inside, or trying to sweep your fear under the carpet, will only mean more issues (including OCD) that continue to get bigger.

Some fears (anxieties) are a little trickier to bring to the surface so you might need professional help, like counselling, to help you deal with them.

When you’re prepared to face your issues, you’ll begin to take back control.

This control will help you deal with your OCD, and with time and practice, you’ll find those intrusive thoughts, routines and rituals, will naturally fall away.

Anxiety Rebalance
Anxiety Rebalance diet tips
Anxiety, Depression, Happiness, Health & Diet, Panic Attacks, Success & Wellbeing

9 Diet Tips for Anxiety (Achieving BALANCE)

While on my three-month rebalancing routine, I stuck to these tips. I found that they helped me so much that I now follow them daily.

1. Eat breakfast

Anxiety will deplete already low levels of energy, so you want to make sure you start your day off right. Breakfast helps fuel you from the get-go, making it the most important meal of the day. Choose something high in energy like granola or porridge, and include a banana.

2. Cut out caffeine

If you think caffeine helps to wake you up, you’re wrong. All caffeine does is bring you back to the state you should already be in. Yes, it’s a stimulant, but you don’t need it. All caffeine is good for is fuelling anxious thoughts. Be aware that tea, like coffee, contains high levels of caffeine. Ideally, seek alternatives like decaffeinated drinks and herbal teas.

If you can’t imagine a life without caffeine (and I’m including this section because there are plenty of people who think this), the theory of BALANCE means you should be able to do what you like, including drinking caffeine. My advice is to do your best to cut out caffeine in the rebalancing period (around three months), because it’s highly likely, in your anxious state of mind, that caffeine will have a negative effect on you. Like anything else, if you choose not to change your habit and continue to drink caffeine, please don’t waste your time wondering why your anxiety isn’t improving. Change often means sacrifice. All sacrifices are harder to make at the start, but get easier with time.

3. Drink lots of water

Drink lots and lots of water throughout the day. It flushes the toxins out of your body and gives you energy – which compensates for the fact you might visit the toilet a little more frequently!

4. Snack at regular intervals

Keep your energy levels consistent throughout the day by snacking at regular intervals. Snack on nuts, vegetables, fruit or any food that is high in energy.

5. Eat bananas

Potassium in bananas helps to balance the sugar levels in your blood, and the carbohydrates in bananas help keep energy levels consistent, so try to eat two or three spread across the day. I appreciate that eating lots of bananas isn’t easy, but make an effort to eat at least one (in the morning). You can also vary it a little by eating other foods that are high in potassium, such as deep-sea fish, yogurt and avocados.

6. Juice

I struggle to fit the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables a day into my diet, so I came up with a solution – juicing. I have a set vegetable juice I drink every day that includes:

a handful of kale
a handful of spinach
two medium carrots
an apple.

The juicer I use: Omega Juicer Nutrition Centre 8006 Chrome 220v

It takes me fifteen minutes to make, and seconds to drink. My big tip is to get a decent juicer. Cheaper juicing machines tend to make a mess and don’t do a great job. Try not to juice too much fruit, because it’s not good for you (I’m told it has something to do with the high sugar content). If you find an all-veg juice not sweet enough, add an apple. Experiment and see what you prefer!

7. Cut out junk food

Eating too much unhealthy junk food will slow you down, reduce your energy levels and make you feel sluggish – the perfect breeding ground for anxiety. It’s also worth noting that spicy food can increase anxiety. (Like caffeine, it can produce symptoms associated with panic.) I’ve never fully trusted fast food for a number of reasons, including animal welfare and what actually goes in the food, so it’s easy for me to avoid it. I can appreciate its convenience, but it can be just as quick and easy to prepare healthy, nutritious meals at home.

If you do decide to treat the kids at the weekend, or avoiding fast-food outlets is impossible for you, most chains have picked up on the fact that people want a healthy alternative to their triple decker, double- bacon-and-blue-cheese special burger. For example, you can buy a salad bowl at Subway. These can be just as fulfilling as one of their foot-longs. They fill you up, they’re a lot healthier, and they don’t make you feel as bloated – all perfect for reducing anxiety, increasing your energy and achieving BALANCE.

8. Chew your food and eat more slowly

Make your food easier to digest by chewing it more and eating more slowly. By chewing more you also trick your brain into thinking you’re eating more than you actually are – which is great for losing a few pounds.

9. Get a good night’s sleep

Your body needs sleep for effective digestion. Poor sleeping patterns (or no sleep) will disrupt the process and aid the fear cycle. The average amount of sleep an adult needs is eight hours, although we’re all different, so you should gauge what you need based on how you feel when you wake up. Sleeping too much, or too little, will not only affect your digestion, but also cause other anxiety-related symptoms. If you choose to prioritise any of these tips, it should be this one – without it, none of the other tips are useful.

Watch my interview with Elite Sleep Coach, Nick Littlehales.

Anxiety Rebalance